‘Mali On The Brink’ is the latest in our series of ‘Local Voices for Peace‘ reports, the aim of which is to raise the profile of civil society perspectives on peace and conflict.

Mali is facing escalating violent conflict that has spread from the peripheral Sahel regions in the far northwest to the centre of the country. Several interlinked micro-conflicts are causing communities to fragment into competing armed factions, with mass atrocities becoming increasingly commonplace.

This report presents the findings of Peace Direct’s ‘Peace Exchange’ that took place in Bamako in May 2018, bringing together 20 representatives from Malian grassroots peacebuilding organisations to discuss the drivers of violent conflict, and the local capacities that exist to build peace.

Recognising the unique advantages that local peacebuilding organisations enjoy, as well as the very significant challenges that they face in Mali, this report puts forward a number of key recommendations for national and international actors, including investing in civic education and infrastructure, and enhancing dialogue between the state and civil society actors. 

The report in full, as well as an Executive Summary with the key findings and recommendations, are available below:

Full Report

Executive Summary

More from the blog

Civilians in northern Syria continue to be under siege, facing constant bombardments and a series of offensives that have killed and displaced thousands. Stuck in the middle of a proxy war between large regional players, civilians in northern Syria have been abandoned by the international community who has failed to put an end to the suffering of the Syrian people. Read more »

03 February 2020

On August 5th 2019, the Jammu and Kashmir Reorganization Bill revoked Article 370 and 35A, splitting the state of Jammu and Kashmir into two Union Territories, Ladakh and Jammu and Kashmir. Ashima Kaul, our Kashmir Local Peacebuilding Expert, travelled to Ladakh to interview local peacebuilders on how this has affected their community. Read more »

13 January 2020

Noor Ghazi was born and raised in Iraq's capital Baghdad. In 2003, after Saddam Hussein was removed from power, her family left for Syria with hopes to soon return. But fighting in Iraq continued and life in Syria brought its own challenges, so Ghazi and her family traveled to the U.S. as refugees in 2008 when she was 18 years old. In a recent phone conversation, she shared her story and her belief in the power of education to create a more peaceful world. Read more »

16 January 2020

More from the blog