‘Mali On The Brink’ is the latest in our series of ‘Local Voices for Peace‘ reports, the aim of which is to raise the profile of civil society perspectives on peace and conflict.

Mali is facing escalating violent conflict that has spread from the peripheral Sahel regions in the far northwest to the centre of the country. Several interlinked micro-conflicts are causing communities to fragment into competing armed factions, with mass atrocities becoming increasingly commonplace.

This report presents the findings of Peace Direct’s ‘Peace Exchange’ that took place in Bamako in May 2018, bringing together 20 representatives from Malian grassroots peacebuilding organisations to discuss the drivers of violent conflict, and the local capacities that exist to build peace.

Recognising the unique advantages that local peacebuilding organisations enjoy, as well as the very significant challenges that they face in Mali, this report puts forward a number of key recommendations for national and international actors, including investing in civic education and infrastructure, and enhancing dialogue between the state and civil society actors. 

The report in full, as well as an Executive Summary with the key findings and recommendations, are available below:

Full Report

Executive Summary

Comments

More from the blog

In this blog post, peace activist Malalai Habibi discusses women's inclusion in the Afghanistan peace process. She calls for action that paves the way for more participation from people from all walks of life in the peace process, to steer the country country towards a peaceful and inclusive future. Read more »

16 August 2019

This is a story of armed conflict and gender, ideologies and the business of war, self-criticism and healing, peacebuilding and education. It is that of a woman who went from being a fighter, to fighting for peace. It is a story that proves how easy it is to get caught at a young age in the labyrinth of war, and how hard it is to detox oneself. Read more »

23 April 2019

Peacebuilding is usually associated with activities undertaken once the fighting has stopped to heal the wounds of war, rebuild a more just socio-political order, and prevent a relapse into violent conflict. This guest post discusses the less adequately explored are the ways in which peacebuilding activities can be undertaken during armed conflict to prevent violence or protect civilians. Read more »

15 July 2019

More from the blog