22 October 2019: Peace Insight provides information on local peacebuilding organisations in areas of conflict. We feature profiles of over 1,700 organisations around the world, as well as blog posts and key data on peace and conflict. Key to our work is our network of ‘Local Peacebuilding Experts’, who help to research and write about peacebuilding and conflict around the world.

Peace Direct is currently seeking Local Peacebuilding Experts to report on peacebuilding work in: Nigeria, Somalia, Sudan, South Sudan, Myanmar, Israel and the Occupied Palestinian Territories, Yemen. 

For this role, we require someone with contacts in the NGO or peacebuilding sector, a strong interest in the media and reporting, and excellent written and spoken English. Local Peacebuilding Experts should be based in the country they cover; we may consider people living outside the country if they have exceptional links to the peacebuilding sector in that country. Priority will be given to local/national applicants. 

The role is not full-time and is not salaried, though Local Peacebuilding Experts do receive a monthly retainer and payment for work published on the website. The work is best suited for people with a passionate desire to share information on peacebuilding with a wide audience.  

In their role, the primary area of work of the Local Peacebuilding Expert will be investigating and supplying information on the work of local peacebuilders. The Local Peacebuilding Expert is expected to submit profiles of organisations, contribute to regular updates on the activities of peacebuilders, and serve as a bridge between Peace Direct and civil society in the country in question. 

If you are interested in becoming Peace Insight's Local Peacebuilding Expert for any of the above countries, please send a CV and a short covering letter outlining your suitability for the role to Joel Gabri: joel.gabri@peacedirect.org  

Deadline for applications: this is an open call for applications. 

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